In his article at Townhall.com, Jerry Newcombe talked about the lost art of Bible meditation. Many today don’t realized that the Bible was the main teaching tool. It provided reading materials, study materials and a moral standard that underpinned society.

We have lost the great art of Bible meditation today, and we are the poorer for it.

We have been losing concentration power through the constant stimulation of media. And it seems to be getting worse. Now, little children are accessing media at their fingertips, perhaps earlier than their little brains can handle it.

We are becoming so distracted that we have lost the ability to focus. “Oh, look—a squirrel.”

Despite the attempts by modern history textbooks and classes to the contrary, the Founders of the United States were men of Christ. Everything that they wrote from the Declaration of Independence through the Bill of Rights relied on biblical principles and standards.

In earlier times, some people spent time contemplating God and the Bible. George Washington spent so much time directly with the Bible or with biblical passages found in the 1662 Book of Common Prayer, which he avidly read, that his writings and speeches (public and private) are replete with biblical phrases and allusions.

The famous picture of George Washington kneeling next to his horse at Valley Forge is not a made-up event. It was a depiction of his normal daily practice throughout the War of Independence. Washington, and the other Founders, believed their fervent prayer on a daily basis ordained the country we claim today.

Jerry’s mentor believed success depended on Joshua 1:8.

The ability to meditate on Scripture may be a lost art, but it is one that is worth recovering. My long time pastor, the late Dr. D. James Kennedy, noted that Joshua 1:8 is the only place in the Bible where it directly promises success. What is that success contingent upon? Meditating on God’s Word.

From a purely secular point of view, the meditation of the biblical passages trained the mind to look at challenges in your life. It encourages you to contemplate those challenges until you came to an understanding. And, if you can come to an understanding of the problems and challenges that you’re facing, it is easier to find workable solutions.

Perhaps, biblical meditations are a skill really worth developing.

Via townhall.com